Water Heater Buying Guide

The cost of heating water consumes almost 20 percent of your household budget, second only to what you spend on heating and cooling your home.

If your water heater is nearing the end of its useful life and you’re thinking of replacing it before disaster strikes, you’ll be happy to know that you have better choices, thanks to recent federal regulations that require water geyser to be more energy-efficient. New storage tank water heaters are required to operate more efficiently, and tankless (instant) water heaters are even more efficient than that.

Typically, homeowners replace their old electric geyser with one of the same types that run on the same fuel—natural gas or electricity. Switching from a tank water heater to a tankless unit can be expensive because it requires you to retrofit your plumbing and possibly your electrical system. But if you’re building a new home or adding to an existing one, installing a tankless water geyser may make economic sense.

Because the tankless water heater performed similarly to each other, we averaged the results of each batch, gas, and electric, and compared that score with the performance of the conventional gas and electric storage tanks and the electric heat pump model. Using the purchase price, annual energy cost, and an estimated cost of installation, we calculated the payback time for both new and replacement installations. Payback time was longer for a tankless unit that replaced an existing storage tank but more reasonable with new construction.

Consider Capacity While Choosing a Water Heater

Tank water heaters typically hold 40, 50, or 55 gallons or more. The size you buy depends on the number of people living in your home and your peak water usage. A family of four, for instance, might take several showers, run the dishwasher, and wash a load or two of laundry on an average day, totaling 100 gallons of hot water or more. But that doesn’t mean that the household needs a 100-gallon storage tank.

For storage-tank water heater online, it’s important to consider the first-hour rating, which is the number of gallons a water heater can deliver in an hour starting with a full tank. You’ll find the FHR on the EnergyGuide label.

Tankless geyser water heaters, of course, don’t hold much water, so the number to look for is the gallons-per-minute rating (GPM). That’s the number that tells you how much hot water the heater can deliver over a set period of time. The higher the GPM, the hotter water the unit can deliver. If you have a big family and multiple bathrooms, you’ll need the best water heater with a higher GPM. A typical shower, for example, uses up to 2.5 GPM.

capacity comparison

Types of Water Heaters

Depending on how much hot water you use and how you’re heating the water (gas or electric), there are several choices. Some types are claimed to cut energy costs by up to half that of regular storage models. But their added up-front costs mean payback time might be longer.

Storage Water Heater

storage-water-heater

Storage Water Heaters are the most common type of water heater. As the name suggests, these consist of an insulated tank in which water is heated and stored until needed then emerges from a pipe on top of the water heater.

There is also a temperature- and pressure-relief valve, which opens if either exceeds a preset level.

Natural gas water heaters typically use less energy and cost less to run (by about half) than electric water heaters, although you should note that gas models cost more at the time of purchase.

Instant Water Heater

instant-water-heater

Rather than storing water, instant water heaters use heating coils to heat the water as you need it. They’re more energy-efficient than a storage tank but provide only a limited flow of hot water per minute—about 3.5 gallons, depending on inlet water temperatures.

They’re best for people who typically aren’t drawing water for more than one user at a time—such as running a shower and dishwasher simultaneously.

Tankless models are best for homes that use natural gas to heat the water; electric models might require an expensive upgrade of the home’s electrical capacity.

Heat Pump (Hybrid) Water Heater

hybrid-water-heater

These capture heat from the air and transfer it to the water. They use about 60 percent less energy than standard electric water heaters. And while they cost more than electric-only models, installation is similar and payback time is short. But they don’t work well in very cold spaces and need to be placed in an area that stays about 40° F to 90° F.

And because the heat pump is on top, a hybrid water heater needs as much as 7 feet of clearance from floor to ceiling. You’ll also need up to 1,000 cubic feet of uncooled space to capture enough heat from the air as well as a nearby drain to discharge the condensate.

Solar Water Heater

solar-water-heater

A roof-mounted cell absorbs the sun’s heat and transfers it to an antifreeze-like fluid in a closed-loop system that runs to the water tank. The best deliver stellar savings in summer, making them attractive for warm, sunny regions. But savings suffer on cold and cloudy days. Most models employ a backup system that kicks in when needed.

Even with federal and local rebates, what you’ll spend to buy and install a solar system can mean you wait 10 to 30 years to recoup your costs.

Features to Consider While Buying Water Geyser

Warranty: Coverage for water heaters typically runs three to 12 years. While you’ll usually pay a bit more for longer-warranty models, we’ve found that they tend to have larger elements or burners that can speed up water heating and have thicker insulation for less heat loss. Choose a water heater with the longest warranty available.

Anti-scale devices: Some brands advertise features that are supposed to reduce the buildup of mineral scale at the bottom of the tank by swirling the water. While the scale can shorten the life of the heating element, you don’t need to invest in fancy features to get a water heater that lasts. Just look for one with a 12-year warranty, which typically includes a longer or thicker element.

Brass vs. plastic drain valves: These are situated near the base of the water heater for a garden hose that drains the heater. Look for brass drain valves, which are more durable than plastic.

Glass-lined tanks: Designed to reduce corrosion.

Digital displays: Help you monitor levels and customize operation. Some electric/heat-pump hybrid water heaters let you set a vacation mode that uses just the heat pump for added efficiency when you’re away. Displays on solar water heaters often show tank and collector temperatures, along with pressure readings and other info.

Best Water Heater Brands

1. Bajaj Electricals

2. Morphy Richards

3. Havells

4. Usha

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